Medscape Today News

 
 
  • Four Die From Heat in Sweltering U.S. Southwest - Reports Four people, including a homeless person and two hikers, have died from the record-breaking heat in the U.S. Southwest, media reports said, where triple-digit temperatures have driven residents indoors and canceled airline flights.
  • U.N. Blames Warring Sides for Yemen's Cholera 'Catastrophe' U.N. humanitarian chief Stephen O'Brien described the cholera outbreak in Yemen, which is fast approaching 300,000 cases, as a "man-made catastrophe" caused by the warring sides in the country's civil war and their international backers.
  • Most U.S. Teens Have Sex by 18, but Pregnancies Down More than half of American teens have had sex by age 18, but teenage pregnancy and birth rates extended their 2-1/2-decade decline because of increased contraceptive use, according to a U.S. government study released on Thursday.
  • France, Germany Will Divide EU Regulation After UK Leaves Germany and France have agreed to divide regulation of banking and drugs between them after Britain leaves the European Union, the German magazine WirtschaftsWoche reported on Thursday, citing anonymous EU sources.
  • EAACI One Nut Allergy Doesn't Rule All Nuts Out Contrary to past thinking, it isn't always necessary for someone with a nut allergy to dodge all nuts and seeds, and avoidance might even prompt more allergies, researchers warn.
  • Lying Flat vs Sitting Up: No Difference in Stroke Outcomes The HeadPoST study -- showing no difference in disability outcomes in stroke patients who were laid flat vs those sitting up for the first 24 hours -- has now been published in the New England Journal of Medicine.
  • Texas Nurse Charged With Death of Second Baby Decades after prosecutors convicted Genene Jones of killing a single infant, a Texas grand jury has indicted the former nurse on a second new charge of murder. Prosecutors hope to prevent Jones’ release from prison, which is scheduled for next year.
  • Registry Data Support NOACs for Single-Risk-Factor AF Ischemic strokes rates were similar between atrial fibrillation patients treated with novel oral anticoagulants and warfarin, but imbalances in the study groups have raised questions.
  • ADA Oral Insulin May Delay Type 1 Diabetes Onset in 'Responders' Oral insulin failed to prevent type 1 diabetes from developing in those at high risk of the disease in this largest ever study to date, but there was a glimmer of hope among one subgroup of patients.
  • WCBP Huge Meta-analysis Finds Deaths From ECT 'Extremely Rare' Patients and clinicians can be reassured that deaths related to electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) are very rare, and the incidence appears to be decreasing, according to a huge meta-analysis.
  • Eating Fish May Reduce Rheumatoid Arthritis Symptoms Eating fish two or more times per week was associated with lower disease activity in a cross-sectional analysis of patients with rheumatoid arthritis.
  • PCMH Implementation Assistance Program Has Mixed Results Most federally qualified health centers that got the help achieved level 3 PCMH status, a new study has found. But they also had more ED visits and hospital admissions than a control group.
  • Relax With a Great Book What books do your nursing peers and colleagues recommend?
  • EULAR One in 10 in Rheumatic Pain Switch Back From a Biosimilar As more and more patients with rheumatic disease switch from a biologic to a biosimilar, a new study assesses how many switch back to the originator.
  • Heart Healthy Lifestyle Tied to Lower Drug Costs People with atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease spend a lot less on medications when they take steps to lower their risk of complications by doing things like getting enough exercise, avoiding cigarettes and keeping their blood pressure in check, a U.S. study suggests.
  • Mother's Cardiovascular Health Tied to Breastfeeding A woman's risk of cardiovascular disease later in life may be influenced by how long she breastfed her children, according to a study from China.
  • New Analytic Approach Pinpoints Laparoscopic Colectomy Savings Laparoscopic colectomy is more cost-effective than open surgery, with most of the savings derived from reduced use of health services after discharge and fewer readmissions, according to researchers who used a novel analytic approach known as instrumental variable analysis.
  • Pediatric Crohn's Patients With Perianal Disease Have Worse Prognosis Pediatric patients with Crohn’s disease have worse clinical outcomes when they have perianal disease, researchers from Israel report.
  • Narrow Range of Maternal Magnesium Sulfate for Fetal Neuroprotection The optimal maternal magnesium target to prevent cerebral palsy in the preterm fetus appears to be within a narrow range at the time of delivery, according to a pharmacokinetic model.
  • Small-Bowel Adenocarcinoma Shows Unique Genomic Profile Genomic profiling demonstrates that small-bowel adenocarcinoma (SBA) is significantly different from colorectal cancer and gastric carcinoma, according to a large study.