Resuscitation News

 
 
  • AHA PARAMEDIC: No Advantage for Mechanical vs Manual CPR Results of the PARAMEDIC trial show no advantage for mechanical compressions using the LUCAS-2 device vs manual CPR.
  • AHA Hypoxia, Hypotension 'Deadly Combo' in TBI A new study shows the combination of hypoxia and hypotension has a synergistic and "profoundly" negative effect on mortality in the setting of traumatic brain injury.
  • Septic Shock: Null Trial Results May Point the Way Two protocols for the resuscitation of patients with septic shock diagnosed in the emergency department did not improve outcomes vs usual care, according to a randomized controlled trial.
  • AHA Postarrest Hypothermia Trials Disappoint and Tantalize Therapeutic hypothermia remains a frontier. A study questioned the value of 33 degrees C as an optimal target temperature; another cast cold water on a strategy for starting the process earlier.
  • Hand Position Matters When Novice Rescuers Perform CPR Novice rescuers doing CPR should contact the victim's sternum with the same hand as the side of the body from which they approach, regardless of handedness, Korean researchers say.
  • Crystalloids May Be Best for Initial Hypovolemia Treatment Among ICU patients with hypovolemia, the use of colloids vs crystalloids was associated with similar 28-day mortality; 90-day mortality was lower with colloids, but this finding was inconclusive.
  • Surviving Cardiac Arrest Improves in Denmark Between 2001 and 2010 in Denmark, there was a significant increase in the percentage of out-of-hospital cardiac-arrest patients who arrived alive at the hospital.
  • High Schools Fall Short of Guidelines for Emergency Plans High schools with automatic external defibrillators and medical emergency response plans in place may still fall short in terms of CPR training and compliance with AHA guidelines.
  • ESC LINC: Similar Outcomes With Mechanical and Manual CPR The lead author is still optimistic for the future of the mechanical device, saying these are the first real data showing safety and efficacy.
  • ESC ESC Congress 2013: Hot Topics Along with some of the usual suspects, this year's ESC program includes a few "out-in-left-field" papers in the lineup of hot-line studies, plus a number of other innovations that the program committee hopes will help remind physicians that the heart is just one organ within the "spectrum of disease."
  • Drug Combo Boosts Neurologically Intact Survival After CPR A combination of vasopressin, steroids, and epinephrine during cardiopulmonary resuscitation followed by daily steroids was associated with more than a doubling in the likelihood of being discharged with a neurologically favorable outcome.
  • French Study Supports Family-Witnessed in-Home CPR Family members who were invited to stay and witness cardiac-resuscitation efforts on a loved one who had a cardiac arrest in the home coped better later on, and their presence did not impede care delivery, in a large study.
  • Fluid Resuscitation Ups Mortality Risk in Children Additional analyses of the 2011 FEAST study shows increased child mortality from fluid resuscitation caused by cardiovascular collapse, rather than fluid overload.
  • Costly Colloids No Better Than Crystalloids in Resuscitation Despite their growing use, colloids prove no better than less expensive crystalloids in restoring lost blood volume, according to a meta-analysis.
  • Hydroxyethyl Starch for Blood Volume Linked to Renal Failure A systematic review excluding questionable literature reveals the potential harm of using hydroxyethyl starch in resuscitation fluids.
  • CPR Longer Than 20 Minutes in Kids 'Is Not Futile' The largest-ever study of in-hospital cardiac arrest among pediatric patients has found that more children than expected survive prolonged periods of cardiopulmonary resuscitation. The results should help dispel the myth that CPR for longer than 20 minutes in kids is pointless, say the authors.
  • SCCM Bacteria Lurking in Resuscitation Bags A new study has found that even apparently clean respiratory equipment is contaminated, suggesting national recommendations are inadequate.
  • SCCM Early Fluid Resuscitation Reduces Sepsis Mortality Early goal-directed therapy guidelines recommend 6 hours, but mortality rates are reduced when fluid resuscitation is within 3 hours of sepsis onset.
  • Postsurgical CPR Complications Are Preventable Many postsurgical cardiac arrests, and the subsequent need for cardiopulmonary resuscitation, could be prevented by better recognition and management of postoperative complications.
  • Hands-Only CPR/Defibrillation Bests Conventional CPR Individuals with bystander-witnessed cardiac arrests undergoing chest-compression CPR and defibrillation with public-access AEDs were 33% more likely to be alive at one month with favorable neurological outcomes than those who underwent CPR with chest compressions and rescue breathing followed by defibrillation.
 
 
 
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