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Figures for:
Ten Years of Experience With the Trivalent Split-Influenza Vaccine, FluarixTM

[Clin Drug Invest 22(11):751-769, 2002. © 2002 Adis International Limited]


Figure 1. Seroconversion factors (a), seroconversion rates (b) and seroprotection rates (c) [immunogenicity criteria defined in Table II] in healthy volunteers aged 18-60 years after influenza vaccination from 1992 to 2001. The horizontal lines indicate the minimal immunogenicity limits set by the Committee for Proprietary Medicinal Products of the European Agency for the Evaluation of Medicinal Products.

Figure 2. Seroconversion factors (a), seroconversion rates (b) and seroprotection rates (c) [immunogenicity criteria defined in Table II] in healthy volunteers aged over 60 years after influenza vaccination from 1992 to 2001. The horizontal lines indicate the minimal immunogenicity limits set by the Committee for Proprietary Medicinal Products of the European Agency for the Evaluation of Medicinal Products.

Figure 3. Geometric mean titres (GMTs) of the three antigen strains of the 2000/01 vaccine before vaccination (0) and 3, 11 and 27 weeks post-vaccination from vaccine recipients 18-60 years of age (a) and those >60 years of age (b). The horizontal lines indicate the minimal GMTs considered adequate for protection by the Committee for Proprietary Medicinal Products of the European Agency for the Evaluation of Medicinal Products.

Figure 4. Seroconversion factors (a), seroconversion rates (b) and seroprotection rates (c) in children aged from 6 months to 5 years after influenza vaccination from 1992 to 1994. The horizontal lines indicate the minimal immunogenicity limits for healthy adults aged 18-60 years set by the Committee for Proprietary Medicinal Products of the European Agency for the Evaluation of Medicinal Products (immunogenicity criteria defined in Table II). The vaccination regimen was dependent on the child's age, previous exposure to influenza and vaccination history. Children aged 6 months received a single dose of 0.25ml and those aged over 36 months received 0.5ml; a second dose, of equal volume to the first, was given after an interval of at least 4 weeks to some children who were not previously vaccinated for or exposed to influenza (unprimed). The only exception was in the study indicated as 1993*, where influenza-unprimed children aged 37-68 months received a single dose.

Figure 5. Seroconversion factors (a), seroconversion rates (b) and seroprotection rates (c) by age group in 92 children aged from 6 months to 18 years who were vaccinated with the 1998 6 cine. In this study, 41 of 53 children <6 years of age and 15 of 39 children years of age received two doses; other children received one dose. The data presented are a composite of the one-and two-dose schedules; allocation to the one-dose or two-dose schedule was determined by previous exposure to influenza or vaccination history. The horizontal lines indicate the minimal immunogenicity limits for healthy adults aged 18-60 years set by the Committee for Proprietary Medicinal Products of the European Agency for the Evaluation of Medicinal Products (immunogenicity criteria are defined in Table II).

Figure 6. Seroconversion factors (a), seroconversion rates (b) and seroprotection rates (c) in influenza vaccine-naïve children who were vaccinated with either one or two doses of the 2000 vaccine. Of the 0.5- to <3-years-old subgroup, 41 received one dose and 42 received two doses; of the 3- to 6-years-old sub-group, 31 received one dose and 28 received two doses. The horizontal lines indicate the minimal immunogenicity limits for healthy adults aged 18-60 years set by the Committee for Proprietary Medicinal Products of the European Agency for the Evaluation of Medicinal Products (immunogenicity criteria defined in Table II).

Figure 7. Seroconversion factors (a), seroconversion rates (b) and seroprotection rates (c) in high-risk patients after influenza vaccination from 1995 to 1999. The horizontal lines indicate the minimal immunogenicity limits for healthy adults aged 18-60 years set by the Committee for Proprietary Medicinal Products of the European Agency for the Evaluation of Medicinal Products (immunogenicity criteria defined in Table II).